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My Town: TV recycling no longer free in Kent County beginning Feb. 16

My Town: TV recycling no longer free in Kent County beginning Feb. 16

----NEWS RELEASE---

GRAND RAPIDS – It seems most households now have flat-screen televisions these days, but many people may still have an older Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) television in their home. Kent County Department of Public Works (DPW) has collected 5.6 million pounds of electronics, including televisions, since 2001, without charging residents a fee. These items are processed by a third-party recycler. CRT televisions contains approximately 5-10 pounds of lead, a toxic component for our environment that can cause a variety of health issues. Due to the increasing cost of recycling televisions, Kent County DPW will begin charging a recycling fee starting February 16.

My Town: Battle of the Buildings energy reduction competition expands for second year

My Town: Battle of the Buildings energy reduction competition expands for second year

Registration is officially open for Michigan commercial and industrial buildings of all sizes interested in joining the U.S. Green Building Council of West Michigan's (USGBCWM) second annual Battle of the Buildings competition. The statewide competition is an expansion of the Battle of the Buildings that started in West Michigan last year.

Battle of the Buildings is an awards and recognition program for energy use reduction. The competition is a way to encourage energy-efficient practices in buildings across the state of Michigan and to instill a spirit of friendly competition among the area’s building owners and operators. Steelcase, Western Michigan University and Nichols have already committed for the 2015 competition totaling over 3,000,000 sq. feet.

My Town: 12 tips to stay safe in this extreme cold

My Town: 12 tips to stay safe in this extreme cold

The Michigan State Police, Emergency Management and Homeland Security Division are sharing their top tips to stay safe in this extreme cold.

"As we saw last winter, these arctic blasts can create hazardous situations," said Capt. Chris A. Kelenske, Deputy State Director of Emergency Management and Homeland Security and commander of the MSP/EMHSD. "Citizens are encouraged to monitor local weather reports and follow the appropriate steps to stay safe during these extremely cold and potentially life-threatening temperatures."

Exposure to these subzero temperatures could potentially cause frostbite and hypothermia, as well as create hazardous driving conditions.

To stay safe during cold weather:

My Town: Time to trash the tree! Free Christmas tree recycling locations

My Town: Time to trash the tree!  Free Christmas tree recycling locations

Christmas is over, which means it’s time to trash the tree.

Many municipalities are offering free tree recycling services to residents with a natural tree.  Some communities are planning to put the trees through a chipper and use the remnants to cover park trails and other green spaces.  Here is the schedule for live tree drop-offs:

Ada Township (Through Jan. 12)

  • Ada Township Park, from 7:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.

 

Alpine Township (Through Jan. 31)

  • Behind Township Hall, 5255 Alpine Ave. NW

 

Cannon Township (Through Jan. 10)

  • West side of the township building; RHS Honor Society will help unload trees Jan. 10 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. (donations encouraged)

 

Courtland Township (Through Jan. 31)

  • Fire Station #1 on 14 Mile Road

 

My Town Wyoming: Determining the future of a tornado-ravaged park

My Town Wyoming: Determining the future of a tornado-ravaged park

WYOMING, Mich.—This week, community members will weigh in on new plans for a Wyoming park destroyed by a tornado nearly six months ago.

On July 6, an EF1 tornado carved a path through Byron Center, Wyoming, Kentwood and Grand Rapids, battering homes and businesses and causing catastrophic damage to Ideal Park.  City officials say the twister destroyed the park’s playgrounds and ripped apart nearly 98 percent of its trees. Since then, city workers have begun the long process of removing the debris and making repairs. Now city leaders are looking to community members to help shape a new master plan for the park.

My Town Wyoming: Making Ideal Park ideal again

My Town Wyoming: Making Ideal Park ideal again

WYOMING, Mich.—The City of Wyoming is looking to community members to determine the future of its tornado-ravaged park.

On July 6, an EF1 tornado carved a path through Byron Center, Wyoming, Kentwood and Grand Rapids, battering homes and businesses and causing catastrophic damage to Ideal Park.  City officials say the twister destroyed the park’s playgrounds and ripped apart nearly 98 percent of its trees. Since then, city workers have begun the long process of removing the debris and making repairs.    Now city leaders are looking to community members to help shape a new master plan for the park.

Kentwood invites Residents to Join in helping restore Trees

Kentwood invites Residents to Join in helping restore Trees

The City of Kentwood is still trying to recoup from the loss of so many large trees that were lost to the Emerald Ash Borer disease. The idea is to restablish some of the beautiful tree lined streets that were lost.

They have initiated a program called Residental Street Tree Program where they invite residents to contact them with a request for a tree to be planted in the boulevard by their homes, between the sidewalk and the street. The City will split the cost of the tree and installation, thereby costing the home owner approximately $200 per tree.

You are invited to contact Community Developement at 616-554-0707 for more on this program.